Knowledge in Context: Colloquium in Honour of Laurence Brockliss and Colin Jones

In 1997, Laurence Brockliss (Magdalen College, Oxford) and Colin Jones (QMUL) published The Medical World of Early Modern France, a landmark in the history of medicine because of its integration of social and institutional history with intellectual history.  It established a vibrant new approach to the history of medicine and knowledge of the early modern period while also encouraging Anglo-French intellectual exchange.

This colloquium has been organized by colleagues and former colleagues to mark the twentieth anniversary of this work’s publication and the year of Laurence Brockliss’s retirement.  Examining the ways in which knowledge is contextualized in early modern Europe and Britain, speakers from a range of historical disciplines (classical scholarship, antiquarianism, philosophy, natural sciences) and from a variety of national perspectives will demonstrate the range of Brockliss and Jones’s impact in integrating intellectual history with other sub disciplines of history.

Speakers include: Gregory Brown (UNLV), Simon Burrows (Western Sydney University), Jean-Luc Chappey (Université Paris 1 Panthéon Sorbonne), Karl Theodore Hoppen (Hull), Cathy McClive (Florida State University), Christelle Rabier (EHESS), and John Robertson (Cambridge)


Registration now open: Standard £40.00; Reduced £20.00

Knowledge in Context Colloquium – Book here


Organizers: Floris Verhaart, Queen’s University Belfast; François Zanetti, Paris Ouest Nanterre; Erica Charters, University of Oxford

We are grateful for funding from The Society for the Social History of Medicine; the History Faculty, University of Oxford; Florida State University; Queen’s University Belfast; and Magdalen College, Oxford.

Travel bursaries may be available for student and early-career attendees: see https://sshm.org/bursaries/

Screen Shot 2017-08-07 at 09.46.16

CFP (special issue). Palgrave Communications:- Socioeconomic factors and mental health: past and present

Palgrave Communications, the humanities and social sciences journal published by Palgrave Macmillan, is currently inviting article proposals and full papers for the following special issue:

Socioeconomic factors and mental health: past and present

Editors: Professor Matthew Smith and Dr Lucas Richert (University of Strathclyde, UK)

 

This article collection will examine how the relationship between socioeconomic factors and mental health has been and is understood in an array of different places and periods. Although much of the focus of current mental health research and clinical practice is on the neurological aspects of mental illness and psychopharmacological treatment, historical research demonstrates that a wide range of factors — from vitamin deficiencies such as pellagra, and infections such as syphilis to traumatic life events — have contributed to the onset and exacerbation of mental health problems. Among all these factors, one looms largest: socioeconomic status. On the one hand, socioeconomic inequality has been long recognised as a potential cause of mental illness, as the history of mental hygiene and social psychiatry during much of the twentieth century demonstrates. On the other hand, however, the mentally ill have also historically faced much socioeconomic hardship; today, a high proportion of the homeless and incarcerated in many countries suffer from mental illness.

 

By exploring this topic across time and place, this collection aims to provide a historical context for today’s mental health crisis, and also to inform current mental health policy, especially attempts to prevent or alleviate mental illness through social change.

 

This is a rolling article collection and as such proposals and submissions will be welcome throughout 2017. However, full submissions received by November 1 will be considered for publication as part of the collection’s formal launch in 2018.

 

Proposals should be submitted to the editorial office at: palcomms@palgrave.com

 

More info: http://www.palgrave-journals.com/palcomms/authors/call-for-papers#Socioeconomic

 

Read more about the journal’s open access policy here: http://www.palgrave-journals.com/palcomms/about/openaccess

 

CFP: Joint Atlantic Seminar for the History of Medicine

October 13-14, 2017

Johns Hopkins University

The Johns Hopkins University Institute for the History of Medicine is pleased to host the 15th Joint Atlantic Seminar for the History of Medicine, October 13-14, 2017 in Baltimore.

JASMed is convened annually for the presentation of research by young scholars working on the history of medicine and public health. The meeting was founded in 2002 to foster a collegial intellectual community that provides a forum for sharing and critiquing graduate research.

We welcome student presentations on any topic and time period and especially hope to receive submissions that speak to this year’s theme, “Truth, Power, and Objectivity in the History of Medicine.” As Bruno Latour cautioned in his 2004 essay “Why has critique run out of steam? From matters of fact to matters of concern,” by demonstrating the lack of scientific certainty and socially constructed nature of facts in their work, historians of science, medicine, and technology are at risk of potentiating the arguments of political extremists, such as climate change skeptics or HIV denialists. This theme directs our attention to the ways in which historians of medicine both establish truths and call them into question. Broadly conceived, the theme highlights questions of perspective and power, including the intersections of race, gender, class, sexuality, and disability. It also invites us to critically consider methodological issues in the field, such as which actors get voices in our narratives, how sources can be used to emphasize or obscure different viewpoints, how evidence and authority are mobilized and balanced, and how claims of objectivity in the medical and scientific discourses influence both our scholarship and the ways it is interpreted.

We encourage submissions from a wide range of scholarly disciplines and are eager to hear new voices in the history of medicine and allied fields. Abstracts should be no more than 300 words and clearly convey the argument, sources, and relationship to existing literature of the paper to be presented. Please submit an abstract no later than June 15, 2017 to jashistofmed.wordpress.com/submit.

Registration for the conference is free and will open in September 2017. If you have any questions, please be in touch via email at jashistofmed@gmail.com.

CFP: What is a Recipe? A Virtual Conversation

 

The Recipes Project is a Digital Humanities and History of Science, Technology, and Medicine blog devoted to the study of recipes from all time periods and places. Our readership and contributors highlight the growing scholarly and popular interest in recipes. Over the five years that the RP has been running, our authors have continued to revisit one key question: what exactly is a recipe?  How do we know one when we see one?  What is their structure? What functions do recipes serve? How are they shared and passed on? Are they a set of instructions, a way of life, or a story? Aspirational or frequently used? Prose, poem, or image? The list could go on!

 

And the question becomes even more complicated when we consider  the ways that social media creates new and innovative formats for conversations about recipes, across disciplines, academic/non-academic boundaries, and the world. At the RP, we’ve found that blogging is a wonderful way for recipes scholars to share their work and interests, but we recognize its limits as static text.

 

Introducing… the Virtual Conversation

We would like to invite you – whatever your background – to join us in our first Recipes Project Virtual Conversation, which will take place across a series of online events over the course of one month (2 June to 5 July).

 

The month-long event will be framed by two more traditional panels of speakers. The first, “Repast and Present: Food History Inside and Outside the Academy,” will be convened at the Berkshire Conference of Women Historians in June. The second will be held in the UK in July, and will feature all of the RP’s editors.  We’ll record these two panels and post them online for discussion.

 

In between these panels, we’ll host a series of virtual events during which we flood social media with images, texts, and conversations about ‘What is a Recipe?’

 

Are you a visual person who loves Pinterest or Instagram? Or do you prefer the brevity and playfulness of Twitter? Do you use recipes in historical re-enactment, or try to reconstruct historical recipes in the lab? Are you a knitter who uses old patterns? Whether you’re a recipes scholar, or a recipes enthusiast, there is a place for you in our conference.

 

During the Virtual Conversation, we will be collecting and archiving presentations for a post-event exhibition site.

 

Types of Presentations

We are open to any form of online presentation on the topic of ‘What is a Recipe?’ You might use Twitter for poems, stories, or essays… Or Instagram, Pinterest, and Snapchat for photo-essays… Or YouTube, Vimeo, or Facebook Live for videos… Or a blog forum… Or you might have another brilliant idea, which we’d love to hear!

 

Participation is open to ALL, whether you decide to present or to simply join the discussion.

 

How to Participate

Please register your interest in participating by contacting Recipes Project editors Lisa Smith and Laurence Totelin by 30 April 2017.

 

In your email, please indicate your activity, medium, and (if any) preferred dates between 2 June and 5 July. In the interests of open participation, we are not vetting abstracts.

 

But in your application, please be detailed, because this will help us as we organise online activities, find participants, and ensure that we have permission to reproduce work on our exhibition site. Some virtual technical support may also be possible, depending on your needs.

 

We have reserved two hashtags for the conference: #recipesconf and #recipesproject. Please use these for all presentations and discussions, so participants can be sure to find each other.

 

We can’t wait to see what you come up with!

 

For more information, please see the CFP at our own website, follow us on Twitter, or see us on Facebook.

Conference. ‘Why is my pain perpetual?’ (Jer 15:18): Chronic Pain in the Middle Ages

Pain is a universal human experience. We have all hurt at some point, felt that inescapable sensory challenge to our physical equanimity, our health and well-being compromised. Typically, our agonies are fleeting. For some, however, suffering becomes an artefact of everyday living: our pain becomes ‘chronic’. Chronic pain is persistent, usually lasting for three months or more, does not respond well to analgesia, and does not improve after the usual healing period of any injury.

 

Following Elaine Scarry’s (1985) seminal work The Body in Pain, researchers from various humanities disciplines have productively studied pain as a physical phenomenon with wide-ranging emotional and socio-cultural effects. Medievalists have also analysed acute pain, elucidating a specifically medieval construction of physical distress. In almost all such scholarship – modern and medieval – chronic pain has been overlooked.

 

The new field of medieval disability studies has also neglected chronic pain as a primary object of study. Instead, disability scholars in the main focus on ‘visible’ and ‘mainstream’ disabilities, such as blindness, paralysis, and birth defects. Indeed, disability historian Beth Linker argued in 2013 that ‘[m]ore historical attention should be paid to the unhealthy disabled’, including those in chronic pain (‘On the Borderland’, 526). This conference seeks specifically to pay ‘historical attention’ to chronic pain in the medieval era. It will bring together researchers from across disciplines working on chronic pain, functioning as a collaborative space for medievalists to enter into much-needed conversations on this highly overlooked area of scholarship.

 

Relevant topics for this conference include:

  • Medieval conceptions and theories of chronic pain, as witnessed by scientific, medical, and theological works
  • Paradigms of chronic pain developed in modern scholarship – and what medievalists can learn from, and contribute to, them
  • Comparative analyses of chronic pain in religious versus secular narratives
  • Recognition or rejection of chronic pain as an affirmative subjective identity
  • Chronic pain and/as disability
  • The potential share-ability of pain in medieval narratives, such as texts which show an individual taking on the pain of another
  • The relationship between affect and the severity, understanding, and experience of pain
  • The manner in which gender impacts the experience, expression, and management of an individual’s chronic pain

 

Confirmed speakers:

  • Dr Katherine Harvey (Birkbeck, University of London, UK), ‘Chronic Pain and the Saintly Bishop in Medieval England’
  • Dr James McKinstry (Durham University, UK), ‘Headaches, Diseases, and Old Age: William Dunbar’s Diagnosis of Chronic Pain’
  • Dr Michele Moatt (National Trust and Lancaster University, UK), ‘Chronic Pain and Prophecy in the Twelfth-century Life of Aelred of Rievaulx
  • Catherine Coffey (Queen’s University, Belfast, Northern Ireland), ‘“Mit zwoelf tugenden stritet si wider das vleisch”: The Body Fighting the Flesh in Mechthild von Magdeburg’s Das fließende Licht der Gottheit
  • Katherine Briant (Fordham University, New York, USA), ‘Pain as a Theological Framework in Julian of Norwich’s Vision and Revelation
  • Dr Nicole Nyffenegger (Bern University, Switzerland), ‘Mary’s Perpetual Physical Pain: Affective Piety and “Doubling”’
  • Prof Wendy J Turner (Augusta University, Georgia, USA), ‘Mental Complications of Pain: Age and Violence in Medieval England’
  • Dr Bianca Frohne (University of Bremen, Germany), ‘Living With Pain: Constructions of a Corporeal Experience in Early and High Medieval Miracle Accounts’
  • Dr William Maclehose (University College London, UK), ‘A Locus for Healing: Saints’ Shrines and Representations of Chronic Pain’
  • Prof Esther Cohen (Hebrew University of Jerusalem), one of the foremost scholars on pain in the Middle Ages, will deliver the keynote address.

 

If you have any queries, including access requirements, please do not hesitate to contact the organiser, Alicia Spencer-Hall.

 

Picture1Picture2This conference is generously supported by the Society for the Social History of Medicine and the Institute of Advanced Studies at University College London.

 

NB. The conference registration fee is £20. The fee is waived completely for concessions (students, the unwaged, retired scholars). Registration for the conference will open shortly, and be conducted via the UCL Online Shop, in the ‘Conferences and Events’

 

Members of the Society for the Social History of Medicine may apply for bursaries to facilitate attendance at this conference. Please see here for full details.

EXPLORING HOSPITAL RECORDS AND ARCHIVES: A Symposium Event for Researchers and Archivists

London Metropolitan Archives, 40 Northampton Road, London EC1R 0HB

Friday 28 April 2017

12.30-4.30pm

FREE – Booking Essential (Lunch is provided)

https://hospitalrecords.eventbrite.co.uk

The event is relevant for people starting their research (undergraduate or postgraduate) or those wanting to explore new routes into academic or historical explorations 

Researching hospital records offers opportunities and presents challenges. Records from the Royal Free Hospital will provide a main focus for the event, alongside other related material from the London Metropolitan Archives (LMA) collections.

There will also be the opportunity to share research ideas, exchange information and network with others researching a range of topics relating to hospital records.

 

PROGRAMME

12.30 – 2pm. Registration and Welcome

  • Networking Lunch
  • Behind the Scenes Tour – an introduction to the archive and its work
  • Document / Collection Viewing – a chance to see and discuss original materials

2pm. Presentations and Open Forum: Accessing and Using Archive Collections

LMA staff will:

  • Introduce the range and type of collections held on site
  • Discuss ways of working with sensitive and challenging material
  • Open up ideas about how Royal Free Hospital record collections have been used to engage and inform the public

3.30pm. Tea

3.45pm. Workshop and Knowledge Share

This practical session will provide participants with an opportunity to discuss, plan and share current research or project work, discuss new proposals and consider the potential of partnership working.

4.20pm Final Round Up

Funded by The Wellcome Trust

 

CFP. Fears and Angers: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives

19-20 June 2017
Arts Two Building, Mile End Campus, Queen Mary University of London

Organised by the QMUL Centre for the History of the Emotions and the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions

CALL FOR PAPERS
According to the wheel of emotions created by the psychologist Robert Plutchik in 1980, angry and fearful emotions are diametrically opposed to each other, as approach and avoidance responses respectively to harmful stimuli.
Plutchik’s is one of many different models suggesting the existence of certain “basic” or “primary” emotions. Such lists almost always include both fear and anger. Historically, fearful and angry emotions have been related to each other in different ways – sometimes opposed, sometimes complementary, and sometimes in another way. For Thomas Aquinas, for instance, ira is alone among the passions in having no contrary.
Although basic emotion theorists tend to treat “fear” and “anger” as singular emotions, even Plutchik’s wheel includes three different intensities for each emotion – from annoyance to rage and from apprehension to terror. Historians tend to be more attuned to cultural specificities of emotional language, concepts and expression, hence the emphasis in this conference on “fears” and “angers” in the plural to encourage a wide range of papers on all sorts of fear-like and anger-like feelings and behaviours in different cultures and periods.
The conference aims to bring humanities scholars of all periods into conversation with each other and with experts in the contemporary study of emotions, including neuroscientists, psychologists, philosophers, and linguists.

Papers can address either a single emotion in the fearful or angry categories, or examine the relationship between the two. Possible topics could include:
–       The varieties of fear – from anxiety and angst to mortal fear and terror. What were the objects and causes of fearful emotions in different times and places?
–       The varieties of anger – from annoyance and irritation to ire, vengeance, fury and rage. The different objects and causes of angry emotions.
–       The history of terms and concepts for different fearful or angry emotions.
–       Visual and literary representations.
–       Material culture and emotions.
–       Theories of fearful and angry emotions in the histories of science, medicine, philosophy, theology, and other learned discourses.
–       The relationships between fearful and angry emotions. Does one cause the other? Are they complementary or opposite?
–       What historical and contemporary approaches to fear or anger can learn from each other.
–       Historical and contemporary debates about the number and identity of the so-called basic or primary emotions.
–       Terror and rage as political emotions (past and present).

Fears and Angers: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives will extend over two days, including plenary sessions by distinguished invited speakers, Round Table discussion groups, and numerous panels consisting of three 20 minute papers with discussion. One or more refereed publications of essays based on proceedings are expected.

The conference website is available here: https://projects.history.qmul.ac.uk/emotions/events/fears-and-angers-historical-and-contemporary-perspectives/

Paper proposals:
For individual paper proposals (20 minutes), individuals should submit a paper title, abstract (c. 250 words), name, brief biography (no more than 100 words), institutional affiliation and status, and contact details. For panel proposals, the organiser of the panel should submit the same information for each of the three speakers, and the name of the person to chair the panel. Please send the proposals to emotions@qmul.ac.uk  (QMUL) and Ms Pam Bond (pam.bond@uwa.edu.au) (CHE) by March 17, 2017.

Conference Committee:
Dr Elena Carrera (Queen Mary, University of London)
Professor Thomas Dixon (Queen Mary, University of London)
Evelien Lemmens (Queen Mary, University of London)
Professor Andrew Lynch (University of Western Australia)
Dr Helen Stark (Queen Mary, University of London)
Dr Giovanni Tarantino (University of Western Australia)

CFP: THE GOVERNANCE OF HEALTH CONFERENCE 2017 

Historical & Contemporary Perspectives on Medical, Managerial and Economic Influence on Health Policy-Making

 

10-12 July 2017

 

At the Liverpool Medical Institution (LMI),

114 Mount Pleasant, Liverpool,
L3 5SR, United Kingdom

 

The second half of the twentieth century witnessed a sea change in approaches to health policy making. In many health systems, there had been heavy reliance on the involvement of the medical profession through their representative bodies and advisory committees. In more recent decades, new sources of expertise have influenced the process. Individual special advisers have improved the technical expertise available to government ministers, and their number has steadily increased. Two new groups in particular have been brought into the process: management consultants and health economists. However, we still appear to know relatively little about what their real impact on health policymaking has been.

This conference will bring together academics, politicians, civil servants, and medical professionals to discuss these and other issues, historical and contemporary.

 

Proposals are invited for papers which consider any aspect of health policymaking, but we particularly aim to encourage debate in the following areas:

  • Medical expertise, clinical autonomy and the role of the professions
  • Economic expertise and the impact of Health Economics
  • Managerial expertise and the role of management consultants
  • Special Advisers and the relationship between politicians and experts
  • The role of think tanks
  • Reorganisation and reform in healthcare
  • Analysis of health systems
  • Theories of policymaking and health
  • International and comparative perspectives on health policymaking

 

We welcome proposals for individual papers (please submit an abstract of 300 words) and panels (please submit an outline of 200 words).

 

We have funding to support the travel, accommodation and conference fees for participants.

 

Please submit proposals by 24 February 2017 to GoH2017@liverpool.ac.uk.

 

Confirmed Keynote Speakers:

 

Rt. Hon. Frank Dobson, Former Secretary of State for Health (1997-99)

Frank Dobson was Labour Member of Parliament for Holborn and St Pancras (1979-2015) and Secretary of State for Health (1997-1999). He oversaw the creation of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE).

 

Scott Greer, Ph.D.

Scott Greer is Associate Professor of Health Management and Policy at the University of Michigan. His research focuses on the politics of health policy, with a special interest in the European Union. He also holds a post of Senior Expert Advisor on Health Governance for the European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies.

 

This conference is part of the Wellcome Trust-funded project The Governance of Health: Medical, Economic and Managerial Expertise in Britain since 1948.  For more information on the project, please visit The Governance of Health website.

 

Enquiries: GoH2017@liverpool.ac.uk

CFP. Society for the Social History of Medicine Postgraduate Conference 2017

In cooperation with the University of Strathclyde and Shanghai University
Funded by the Wellcome Trust

Health Histories: The Next Generation
October 12-13, 2017
Shanghai University, China

https://www.strath.ac.uk/humanities/schoolofhumanities/history/healthhistoriesthenextgeneration/

The Society for the Social History of Medicine periodically hosts an international conference for postgraduate students. The 2017 conference committee welcomes papers on any topic within the discipline of the social history of medicine and particularly encourage proposals for papers and panels that critically examine or challenge some aspect of the history of medicine and health. We welcome a range of methodological approaches, geographical regions, and time periods.

Proposals should be based on new research from postgraduate students currently registered in a University programme. Paper submissions should include a 250-word abstract, including five key words and a short (1-page) CV. Panel submissions should feature three papers (each with a 250-word abstract, including five key words, and a short CV), a chair, and a 100-word panel abstract.

For postgraduate students not currently funded through an existing fellowship or grant, funding is available to cover the costs associated with visas, travel, and accommodation in Shanghai. Upon confirmation of an accepted abstract, each postgraduate student is required to apply for a visa to travel to China. For more information about visas, please see https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/china/entry-requirements.

All postgraduate delegates must register (or already be registered) as members of the Society for the Social History of Medicine. For more information about SSHM student membership, please see http://www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/sochis/access_purchase/price_list.html.

To propose an abstract, please visit:
https://www.strath.ac.uk/humanities/schoolofhumanities/history/healthhistoriesthenextgeneration/abstractsubmission/

To propose a panel, please visit:
https://www.strath.ac.uk/humanities/schoolofhumanities/history/healthhistoriesthenextgeneration/panelsubmission/

Submissions and queries should be sent to Mrs Caroline Marley: cshhh-admin@strath.ac.uk.

Conference Organizers:
Dr Stephen Mawdsley, University of Strathclyde
Professor Yong-an Zhang, Shanghai University

Abstract Deadline: 10 March 2017

 

 

 

征文通知

2017年英国医疗社会史学会研究生国际会议

举办:英国思克莱德大学和中国上海大学

资助:英国惠康基金

主题:医学史:新一代研究者

时间:2017年10月12-13日

地点:中国·上海大学

https://www.strath.ac.uk/humanities/schoolofhumanities/history/healthhistoriesthenextgeneration/

定期召开由研究生参加的国际会议,是英国医疗社会史学会的传统。今年的会议,学会委员会欢迎研究生们提交任何属于医疗社会史研究范畴的论文,尤其鼓励那些对既有的医疗卫生史研究进行批判性审视的论文以及小组会议计划书。我们欢迎参会论文涉及不同的研究取径、研究地域以及历史时期。

提交至会议的计划书需要是在读研究生们正在从事的研究。欲参会者需要提交一份包含五个关键词的250字左右的摘要,以及一份个人简历(一页)。小组会议的计划书需要包含三篇论文(每篇论文也需提供250字左右的摘要,以及一份个人简历),小组会议主席姓名,以及一份100字的小组会议摘要。

目前没有奖学金或其他资助的研究生们可以获得会议资助,以支付参加此次会议的签证、旅行、以及在上海的住宿费用。如若申请参会获得通过,请研究生们申请前往中国的签证,关于申请签证的信息,请访问https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/china/entry-requirements.

所有与会的研究生们需要注册为(或者已经是)英国医疗社会史学会的会员。关于英国医疗社会史学会学生会员的信息,请访问http://www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/sochis/access_purchase/price_list.html.

提交个人摘要者请访问:

https://www.strath.ac.uk/humanities/schoolofhumanities/history/healthhistoriesthenextgeneration/abstractsubmission/

提交小组会议摘要者请访问:

https://www.strath.ac.uk/humanities/schoolofhumanities/history/healthhistoriesthenextgeneration/panelsubmission/

个人简历及其他咨询问题请提交至Mrs. Caroline Marley: cshhh-admin@strath.ac.uk.

会议组织者:思克莱德大学Stephen Mawdsley博士;上海大学张勇安教授

摘要提交截止日期:2017年3月10日

 

CFP. Postgraduate Medical Humanities Conference

29th – 30th June 2017

Call for Papers

 

Keynote Speakers

Victoria Bates (Bristol)

Ina Linge (Cambridge)

Hannah Morgan (Lancaster)

 

The by now well established University of Exeter Postgraduate Medical Humanities Conference is returning in 2017 for the fourth consecutive year to showcase the diversity of contemporary medical humanities research. Our conference this year will provide a platform for an international community of postgraduate researchers to share insights and network with academics working within and across disciplinary boundaries.

While we encourage innovative submissions that relate to any aspect of medical humanities, the following subject areas are of particular interest:

  • History of medicine
  • Disability studies
  • Gender and sexuality
  • Transformations of the body
  • History and philosophy of science
  • Occupational health and industrial psychology
  • Trauma studies
  • Affect studies
  • Medicine and the law
  • Medicine and the body in popular culture
  • Literature and medicine
  • Medical practise and issues of intersectionality
  • Globalization and biomedical practice

Although all proposals must address the conference’s central theme, we welcome scholarly submissions from those operating outside of traditional humanities research settings, such as medical students and community activists.

Applicants are invited to submit abstracts of up to 300 words (for 20-minute previously unpublished papers) to pgmedhums@exeter.ac.uk by Friday 10th February 2017 with “PGMH 2017 Conference Abstract” written in the subject line of the email. We are also keen to receive panel and workshop proposals. These should include 300-word abstracts for up to four speakers, along with a 500-word overview that explains the aims and rationale of the session.

We hope to offer a small number of travel bursaries for this event, the details of which will be announced in due course.

 

http://humanities.exeter.ac.uk/history/research/centres/medicalhistory/newsandevents/conferences/pgmhconference2017/